Irons in the Fire

Irons in the Fire – Bepuzzled – 135 pieces

Normally “mystery” puzzles aren’t my thing. Not because I don’t care for the mystery aspect of it, but because almost every single one I’ve ever done or looked at has had terrible quality. This was a thrift store purchase though, and for some reason I was willing to take a chance on it this time.

It’s a good thing too, because this is the best quality puzzle from this brand that I’ve ever seen. The pieces were thick (like, Ravensburger thick) and fit together well, if slightly loosely. It’s a double-sided puzzle, so one side is shinier and feels a little more stiff; but that is how double-sided puzzles are, no matter the brand. Overall, the quality was impressive.

**I’m going to say that I’ve done a few Bepuzzled puzzles before, and my impression is that overall the quality is underwhelming, and at times REALLY bad. My opinion is only for this puzzle, not the brand.**

Here’s the mystery…. Four business partners are golfing; Howie, Will, Flip, and Duff. Someone has been selling company secrets and a private detective has been hired by Howie to find out who. Howie gets attacked and kidnapped after the round of golf, and what is found is the following picture. (There’s much more info to the story, but this is the gist of it)

I’m giving the solution below, so stop reading here if you have this puzzle and don’t want any spoilers.


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What the police found was everything in disarray, but four clubs laid out neatly in a row next to his open cell phone. The 3, 5, 4, and 7 irons in a row – using the number/letter combinations on the phone – spell out who was stealing company secrets and who arranged to have Howie taken.

Flip.

Life Rules

Life Rules by Louise Carey – Andrews + Blaine – 1000 pieces

This was not an easy puzzle. Luckily, I was looking for a difficult/tedious puzzle to put on the board while I was working on all the micro puzzles for the holiday season – this one fit the bill perfectly. Putting together large letters isn’t as simple as some may think. This one tried to melt my brain!

I always love having words to assemble in a puzzle, but when the words are basically the whole image – or even when they’re just very large – it can become quite difficult. All the pieces are basically just the background color, and the color of the letter. And there were only four colors in this image, each color was used multiple times for their own set of words. It was quite the challenge.

The easiest part of this assembly was the sorting. I just had one tray for each color, and one container for any pieces that were only the background. I worked on one color at a time. Sometimes the font used for one quote was simple to find, but much of the time it wasn’t as easy to pick out the right pieces for a certain quote.

Because it was so tall and thin (13 x 37 in.), it was easy to push to the back of the board when I wanted a break from it – and that is exactly what I did. When I felt myself getting too frustrated I stopped and worked on something else. 😎

My fellow P.A.D.S. sufferer Penny sent me this several years ago, but I was never in the right frame of mind to work on it. I never have my puzzles in any order to be assembled, my brain has to be in the right “head space” to work on an image; so the puzzle I’m doing next has to speak to me in some way. This puzzle has previously never had much to say – except, “Put me back, you don’t want any of this today.”

Miss Penny has since been informed that she wasn’t getting this puzzle back – after all the work that went into this one I’ve glued the bleeping thing and will be hanging it in the puzzle room. I love the look of it, and couldn’t bear to disassemble it after all that effort!